Debt and wealth in a monetary system, part 2: discounted valuation issues in a declining frame with inequalities.

We are presently building up conflicts within the asset price frame:

  • Conflicts between asset values and GDP flows and their growth rates;
  • Between asset prices and return expectations;
  • Between human capital values and the distribution of those values and their impact on the overall wealth equation with respect to future consumption risks as well as asset pricing via increased asset focus of flows due to distribution dynamics;
  • Within portfolio structure and relative to the liquidity and capital security dynamics of liability streams. 

All of this tied to the relationship between frame transitions, emergent properties and structural imbalances and unconventional monetary policy focused overly on asset price support.

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Are debt and wealth really two separate forces in a monetary system? Part 1

I write with reference to a discussion in a recent Bloomberg View article, We’re Still Not Sure What Causes Big Recessions.

Debt/broad money supply is a key foundation of asset and human capital values and their supporting GDP flows.  Because of this, wealth and debt effects (new loans create deposits) on GDP/income flows should not be considered as separate forces. 

Debt in its money supply origination (bank deposits) is a foundation of both GDP flows and asset values and it is when debt, and specifically in the form defined, increases relative to GDP/national income flows that we should pay attention.  And we need to pay attention to all flows, not just income flows on risky assets, for example corporate profits which can squeeze out returns on both fixed interest and human capital during periods of enforced low interest rate policy.

Money leverages many activities, and asset values are always to a certain extent in a form of a bubble, but excess leverage, especially during periods where we have structural imbalances and frame transitions creates instability and risks to the financial system. 

Frame transitions that we need to watch out for with respect to excess asset focused money supply growth are where drivers of GDP growth are in decline (labour and population demographics, productivity and global transitions impacting the same) requiring lower levels of capital or growth rates of capital accumulation resulting in increasing levels of capital depreciation.  In this context monetary frame dynamics should also be contracting or slowing.  Frame transitions can be accentuated by increasing income and wealth inequality, something that may also be an emergent property of economic systems during frame transitions.   This can also leverage asset prices to prospective GDP flows.

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