US retail sales…Is the Sun really shining again?

Retail sales takeaways:

  • In rebound mode, but nothing as yet to suggest trend of slowing growth cycles has been broken.
  • Motor Vehicle and Parts sales, a key driver of sales growth heretofore, looks to have slipped to a much lower gear: less consumer credit growth fuelling demand?
  • Retail sales adjusted for CPI ex shelter and adjusted for population growth only just bubbling up around pre crisis levels.
  • Seasonality: some questions over the extent to which seasonality is impacting the data.
  • Inventory to retail sales growth at historically high levels: economy exposed to heightened short term risks to spending.
  • CPI ex shelter, flatlining post 2012.
  • Boundaries to retail sales growth: consumer credit to disposable income ratios, long term income growth declines, peak personal consumption expenditures and continuation of weak profile post late 1990s: longer term dynamics at play.

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Perspectives on US New Manufacturing Order data:

Key takeaways:

  • The frame should dominate analysis of new order fundamentals: long term weakness dominates.
  • The new order bounce back in March/April was led by the transportation sector (MVPs in particular), but the bounce back should be set against the depth of the declines.
  • Outside transportation the trend is very weak.
  • Consumer durable goods orders on a smoothed 6 monthly basis have weakened noticeably since the start of the year.

Commentators are increasingly concerned about the risk of a recession in the US Economy.  Recessions are typically short term step backs/retracements within expanding frames whereas we are in a rather complicated contracting one the one hand (developed economies) and transitioning frame (developing economies moving from investment dependence to consumption/service sector dependence) on the other characterised by excessive debt levels, unconventional monetary policy and increasing income inequality to name but a few fundamental issues. 

So let us look at US manufacturing new order data, at first in terms of the frame, which bounced back on a monthly basis in April:

The frame

We can see from the following chart that annualised real growth rates over rolling 10 year time frames (using new order data adjusted for PPI and smoothed) have been heading downwards since the start of the decade.  The real annualised rate of growth over rolling 10 year time frames shows that the current cycle is much weaker than the pre 2008 cycle.

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We can see the step down in growth more easily if we just view the high water mark dynamics (which ignores the current index level if it remains below the HWM).

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In reality given the declines in flows since 2014, new orders for manufacturing adjusted for the PPI stand below levels reached at the end of the 1990s, and yet, here we are all worried about the risk of recession when the risk of something far greater has already occurred.  Tied into the frame is the key dynamic of global rebalancing: cheap labour in emerging/developing economies had offshored a significant amount of manufacturing output from the late 1990s onwards (the weak order data partly reflects this) and the expected maturing of developing economies consumers and rising wage costs was anticipated by many to create a rebalancing of global economies.  This is presently at risk a) due to the time frame of transition being longer than many expect and b) given that technology is driving out labour in key industries.

And in the next chart we see nominal annualised rates for new orders over rolling 10 year time frames: clearly the structure and balance and dynamics of the US economy and the attendant global economic dynamics are unable to support the type of growth the economy had experienced in post WWII years.  The primary issue we are facing today is not one of a prospective recession but of a weakening frame:

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US ISM Manufacturing PMI…supplier deliveries, a true or false signal?

The US ISM Manufacturing PMI ticked up marginally today indicating slightly stronger manufacturing activity.  The change was small from 50.8 to 51.3.   While output and new order indicators fell, employment remained the same and inventories declined slightly, supplier deliveries slowed at the fastest pace for some time.  The month on month change in supplier deliveries was 10.2%, only bettered on 5 occasions over the last 35 years.  

But supplier deliveries tend to lag new orders and we also know that new manufacturing orders fell significantly in late 2015 and have since bounced back (data in the chart below is to March 2016). 

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The bounce in supplier deliveries look to be related to the bounce back in PMI new order indicator starting in late 2015 and we can see this lag here:

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The bounce in new order data was also the strongest since the recession ended and is usually associated with cyclical turning points. 

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But, with the continued slowdown in global manufacturing PMIs and weakness in the ISM’s other PMI components as well as weakness in readings from Markit’s own indicator I would not be too upbeat about any possible signal.  We appear to be stuck in a slowing growth trend market by downs and gradually weakening ups!

And from Markit’s own PMI release:

“The survey data indicate that factory output fell in May at its fastest rate since 2009, suggesting that manufacturing is acting as a severe drag on the Page 2 of 3 © Markit economy in the second quarter. Payroll numbers are under pressure as factories worry about slower order book growth, in part linked to falling export demand but also as a result of growing uncertainty surrounding the presidential election

Thoughts on revisions to US manufacturing new order data

US durable goods order data out yesterday suggested a strong rebound in new orders in April led principally by transportation orders.  But I am not going to talk about the new data (at least until I get the full manufacturing new order data set due shortly), I want to talk about the difference between the new and the old order data:

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Data to March 2016 had been revised down by some 2% for manufacturing orders and the rate of revision was similar for both durable and non durable goods.

However the wider picture shows that transportation, in particular motor vehicles and parts orders showed significant upward revisions:

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On the other side of the variance we see non defence capital goods excluding aircraft, computers and electronic goods and primary metals heavily negatively revised:

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The picture confirms the relative strength we have seen in auto led consumer credit growth on the one hand and weakness in exports and capital expenditure on the other.

US retail sales….not so pretty a picture

Some concerns with the April data:

  • April is seasonally a weak month and any transfer of consumption capacity to it would skew the monthly data in favour of a higher seasonally adjusted change.
  • It is not the rebound in the data that is important but the strength of the trend.  The pattern over the last 3 years is for a weakening in the strength of the rebound and retail sales growth.
  • Inventories are high relative to sales but they have likely never been higher once we factor in the growth rate of inventories relative to sales.

And the supporting graphics:

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Seasonally adjusted retail sales grew at the fastest rate for some time.  Eye popping almost! But April is typically a weak month and we have had relative weakness during Q1 2016.  

The following chart shows the actual, unadjusted, expenditure on a monthly basis for the above seasonally adjusted chart.  If consumption capacity had been transferred to April from prior months its adjusted impact would have been skewed.

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More importantly is whether the rebound in adjusted consumption represents a continuation of a weakening trend or not?  This is the real question!

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Also, retail inventories relative to sales remain at relatively high levels:

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The highest level since 2004/2005.  However, once we realise that 2004/2005 inventory levels accompanied higher retail sales growth relative to inventory growth we can see that the inventory/sales dynamic is weaker still.

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US Q1 GDP..big picture concerns conflate with shorter term weakness!

The big picture is the risk that growth may well have peaked in the current cycle:

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And personal consumption expenditure flows (population adjusted) have arced in a worrying sign of secular decline for some time:

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GDP growth less private employment growth has been negative since Q4 2010, one of the very few such periods in the post war period and the weakest to date and symptomatic of weak productivity and wage growth:

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Preliminary US GDP grew by a real $22bn in the first quarter.  Given that we are unlikely to see the weather related bounce back in growth that we saw last year, we are left wondering where growth is going to come from in the second and third quarters, especially if global trade fundamentals remain weak.

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US retail sales…update

It is a trend I have been following for some time….global growth is slowing down at a time in the cycle when you would usually expect to see inflation and supply bottlenecks.  If it were not for the very high levels of asset focussed money supply growth over the last few decades and the build up of debt and asset values (dependent on this growth), I would not be ringing any bells.  But the divergence between what asset values need growth to be and what growth is turning out to be is the problem.

US retail sales (I am still waiting for the CPI update which will allow for a better assessment of retail volumes) took a further hit in March:

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The biggest contributor to the recent slide has been motor vehicles and parts sales.  This component has also been the biggest contributor to retail sales growth post the 2008/2009 recession and a large contributor to significant increases in consumer credit debt loads:

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The inventory picture has also darkened with the longer term inventory to sales relationship showing an unusual divergence:

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Last month’s analysis

http://blog.moneymanagedproperly.com/?p=5056

US retail sales

With the recent CPI data I have updated my retail sales graphics.  Takeaways?

  1. Sales growth is slowing but no recessionary conditions;
  2. Weak historical growth profile held up by motor vehicles and parts sales;
  3. Motor vehicle and parts sales held up by consumer credit growth;
  4. Points 2 and 3 slowing;
  5. While personal disposable income has exceeded retail sales growth of late, cumulative historic relationship remains weak;
  6. Consumer credit growth to income relationships strained;
  7. Population growth weak in historical context;
  8. Current cycle lacking in typical wage growth spike

And the graphs:

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US Retail Sales, Industrial Production, Manufacturing New Orders

Nominal retail sales data is typical of a recessionary environment, but much of this is due to declining gas prices.  Manufacturing output and new order data is also typical of recessionary conditions.   Motor vehicles and parts sales/new orders/output are still strong data points albeit showing signs of weakening, especially in the auto components.  Cycle to cycle we see retail sales, orders and output all failing to establish a clear positive post crisis fundamental growth trajectory.   That said there does not appear to any abrupt collapse in the data which is not necessarily a positive.

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Would the real US employment figure please stand up: the Birth/Death adjustment debate.

A number of commentators have questioned the underlying momentum in the US economy.  If we assume that today’s birth death adjustments are based on latest data as of Q4 2014, and 2014 Q4 showed the largest increase in employment since 1983, and the latter half of 2014 represented a relatively strong period of economic growth in the current cycle, then just maybe, if the cycle is turning, then there is a risk that current employment data may be increasingly wide of the mark.

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In the latest report on US employment we see private jobs growth averaging 222,000 a month over the last three months.  On the face of it, employment growth suggests that all is well with the economy despite the slowdown in manufacturing and world trade. 

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Some takeaways from third quarter Canadian GDP and other data–27 charts

Durable goods consumption expenditure rose at an annualised pace of 9.4% (autos?) in the third quarter; business gross fixed capital formation (Commodities?) has fallen for three quarters in a row following a weak Q4 in 2014; inventory accumulation slowed dramatically (?); imports of goods and services fell for the second straight quarter running off the back of two weak quarters in Q4 2014 and Q1 2015.

The change in net exports that contributed SO MUCH to GDP showed an historically large bounce, shown here as a rolling two month data piece:

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Some of the main takeaways from US Q3 GDP 2nd estimate

The growth trend is still fundamentally weak, over reliant on consumer credit and exposed to a potential inventory correction.

Post the debt fuelled 90s and 00s, growth has tailed off as shown by the annualised real growth rate over rolling 5 year time periods.  As noted in prior posts, growth between the 90s and onset of the “crisis” was very likely overly leveraged:

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Growth is still historically weak and if we take away increases in consumer credit and adjust for inventories, the trend remains so:

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US employment figures in the context of consumer credit and inventories.

The US economy is no ordinary cake in the oven and the release of the latest employment numbers do nothing to disprove this analogy.   Global economic growth is continuing to slow as evidenced by trade numbers, manufacturing data and a host of PMIs.  The direction of cause in this most recent of trends has been from key emerging economic regions.  The direction of cause is one for concern given the importance of the development of consumer markets in emerging economies to aging and slowing developed economies.  A slowdown in emerging market growth is important for asset markets and financial stability (loan servicing and financing) given that asset values and debt financing are heavily predicated on a discounted future.  The possible impact on global growth and financial stability of this reversion of cause and hence flows may well prove to be of significance.

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Was the US Q2 GDP revision so great?

The main changes to Q2 GDP came from revisions to non residential fixed investment, inventories and government spending.  But we must a) also remember that the prior GDP base had also been reset lower following the most recent GDP revisions and b) consumer credit growth has become increasingly important to GDP growth of late (as it has in places like UK):

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Making sense of US employment data and the interest rate decision.

We have relative strength in certain sectors supported by a steady increase in employment and growth in consumer credit. The backdrop is weak domestic productivity and income growth, an unsettling composition of employment growth and global economic weakness, in particular a possible global trade shock centred in China. The US is still growing slowly and while there are signs the labour market is tightening there remains considerable structural slack and remaining structural imbalances of concern.

A rise in interest rates may well be needed in the light of growth in consumer credit, but I have concerns over the fact that wage growth has yet to ignite, that capital investment expenditure remains weak and that the Federal Reserve’s own views of economic growth potential may well be above that which the economy itself is able to produce. Has the US economy returned to the normalcy envisioned by policy makers and with it its interest rate setting policy? I think not, but I also feel that the divergence between income growth and consumer credit growth is a considerable problem and one that may come back to bite the US if China weakens further.

Has demand moved to a level that would generate capital expenditure that many feel is necessary to push growth back to higher levels and would a rising interest rate scenario cut this particular and necessary part of the cycle short? This critical intersect may be a key consideration in any interest rate decision.

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US – Some interesting charts on income, GDP and new manufacturing orders from recent data

There are some interesting patterns and trends in US data: so I do ask myself, are we at the peak of the current cycle, are we as far as debt and low interest rates can take us?

US income growth has long been acknowledged to have weakened considerably yet recent data shows that the trend has indeed been weaker than first thought.  Note the following chart showing pre and post revisions to chained per capita personal disposable income:

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In the context of interest rate decisions you have to ask yourself just what are we waiting for?

I have seen that the IMF has asked the Fed to defer interest rate increases until we see clear signs of wage increases and inflationary pressure.

The request IMO is both scary and rationale given that so much of today’s National Income Accounting Identity (output=C+I+X-M) relies on factors that lie outside of its operation.  I speak of new bank generated loan growth given that income growth/distribution and investment growth still appear to be weak in the scheme of things..i.e. C+I the drivers. 

The last time the FRB delayed interest rate increases we had a debt financed consumption boom in the US followed by IR increases and a de facto financial collapse.   By raising rates we likely restrict one of the few modes of generating consumption growth in the US (note auto loans) and many other countries.  We also likely raise the impact of existing debt burdens on what are to date still historically low rates of income/wage growth.  

As such you have to ask yourself just what are we waiting for?  Well we need higher income growth, but not just higher income growth: we need a more equitable and fair distribution so that economic growth itself becomes less reliant on debt and low interest rates, and less exposed to the scary divergence of asset values. 

But the world is also changing in ways that question whether we can effectively outwait the inevitable: populations are aging and declining.  Areas where the frame can still expand in consumption terms, areas such as China, may be heading into their own period of slow growth and low IR debt support. 

Importantly will the status quo submit to a reconfiguration of the pie and can the world assume a less debt dependent economic raison d’etre?  

So yes, the rationale to defer interest rate rises is both scary and realistic, but it fails to answer important questions: what are we waiting for, how long can we wait, and are our hopes realistic? 

This is just a quick 3 minute post, but the issues are critical!

US Manufacturing Orders

After a strong mid 2014 new orders had fallen heavily with nominal order data especially hard hit.  After an initial slide the trend seems to be levelling out, but levelling out is not what the economy needs.

Long term, the order profile is flat if we adjust for prices – note I have adjusted for producer prices not order prices, although over time I expect little difference.

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Annual growth rates have taken a punch to the gut, but if we adjust for monthly variance and producer prices we find that the downturn is less marked, although not necessarily insignificant:

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What I do find interesting, and which backs up my thoughts re last summer’s surge in activity, is the fact that the rise in activity towards the middle of last year is more or less reflected in the downturn in the early part of this year.   This pattern comes about after adjusting for PPI and basing % changes on rolling 6 month average data to arrive at a better fix of actual capacity and order flow:

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Motor vehicles and parts seems to be the notable exception, but I do have concerns over debt financing and weak income growth.

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World Trade

Some charts and brief comments I forgot to post:

Growth in world trade volumes has fallen off significantly since summer 2014:

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Interestingly US trade data shows a tail off in US auto exports and a rise in Auto imports.  Imports rose strongly in March and fell back in April (opposite for exports), although much of this has been ascribed to the impact of West Coast port strike issues.

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Is Private Investment Expenditure in the US really looking strong?

Is investment expenditure in the US really looking strong?   I picked up some tweets on this the other day which stated that it was indeed.

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The above graph shows domestic investment of US private business net of capital depreciation. A couple of points should strike you immediately: one nominal expenditure peaked back in the late 1990s; two, a lot of the retracement (or the pluck as Friedman might have said) is a consequence of the unprecedented decline seen during the dark days of 2009.  

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Not a “Savings Glut” per se but a monetary excess amidst a period of complex global structural economic change!

If you stream through the data it is pretty clear that developed economy growth has been slowing for some time and that monetary policy has accommodated this adjustment with lower interest rates and a relaxed attitude towards money supply growth.  At about the same time these trends were moving ever closer to their sweet spot on the horizon (because we are not yet at peak of this particular movement) certain developing markets really got going, with the help of a fair amount of their own monetary stimulus but also by a reconfiguration of global supply chains and offshoring in key economies.  All factors combined to create a heady and dangerous global financial imbalance, a weak bridge cast across a widening economic divide.  No wonder it all came crashing down..but who was to blame?  The world’s central bankers who were blindsided into excessively lax monetary policy by a low inflationary world that had become obsessed with laying off and chopping and dicing of risk to those “who could best absorb and bear it”, or some of the finer strings in the mesh?  Well, some have chosen to blame excess savings in the emerging/developing part of the world, principally China, but this is all too pat.   The “savings glut” theory, if you can really call it “excess savings”, was merely a return of serve of part of the vast ocean of financial and monetary excess that barrelled through the early to mid 2000s.

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Some brief thoughts on US Incomes and expenditures

Inflationary dynamics have brought about a large relative increase in real incomes over the last six months or so. 

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Yes it looks as if much of the most recent improvement has not been “spent”, but it is only 1 or 2 months into this gap which must itself be set against strained income increases over the last decade.  Longer trends and frames remain important for the sustained growth rates over time and the current frame remains a weak one.  Personal consumption expenditures as a % of disposable income remain at historically high levels and consumer credit growth may also be a notably factor weighing against leeway for growth in consumption (see end of post).

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